Book Nerd: A Return to Reading + 11 Short Books to Get You Started

I caught on to the joy of reading at an early age. My parents are both readers, and their passion was contagious. I read books under the covers when I was supposed to be taking a nap. I loved going to the library with my mom and picking out books. I was the kid in class who got in trouble for reading a book in her lap rather than paying attention to the teacher’s lecture. I devoured books.

But I stopped reading in college. Well, I read textbooks and book assignments of course, but I didn’t read recreationally. Like most students, I just didn’t have the time. Graduate school was the same story. I both worked and studied full time.

When I finally finished school and found myself with a surprising amount of free time on my hands, I slowly returned to my passion for reading. I struggled at first to focus, to really let go and lose myself in the stories, but now I consume books like they are sustenance.

It’s easy to fall out of the habit of reading. We get busy, get distracted, get interested in other things. Then it’s hard to get started again, to make the time to sit down and commit to a book. Sometimes it’s easiest to start small, to start with a short book that requires a minimal time commitment and that we can absorb in small doses.

Here are some great short books, less than 200 pages (depending on the edition), capable of reviving one’s passion for reading:

Mice

Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck – 112 pgs.

Two drifters dream of one day having their own piece of land but in the meantime find work at a California ranch, but difficult situations arrive that force them to face the harshness of reality. It’s a short, simple story but it hit me hard, and it’s written perfectly.

Night

Night by Elie Wiesel – 120 pgs.

This is a memoir of Wiesel’s personal experience in the Nazi concentration camps. It’s candid and dark and insightful as he contemplates the nature of humanity and the existence of God. I read it in junior high, and it was my first experience with such a powerful read.

Stranger

The Stranger by Albert Camus – 123 pgs.

A man goes on trial for committing murder, but one soon realizes that it’s his lack of social conformity that quietly condemns him. This is a prime example of how a great author can pack and immense amount of commentary and philosophy into a short novel.

GiftFromSea

Gift from the Sea by Anne Morrow Lindbergh – 144 pgs.

I read this on my honeymoon swinging in a hammock on the beach. It’s a quiet, contemplative read comprised of the author’s thoughts and reflections on her life as a wife, mother, and writer. It’s considered a classic, written in 1955, but is still wholly relevant to modern times.

Tuck

Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbit – 160 pgs.

A century ago, the Tuck family found and drank from a spring that turned out to be a fountain of immortality. When ten-year old Winnie finds the spring in the woods by her house, the Tuck family kidnaps her to buy time to convince her why drinking from it is a bad idea. Meanwhile, a dark stranger is hunting them.

LivedInCastle

We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson – 160 pgs.

After a gruesome tragedy, a family of three sequesters themselves inside their home, safe from the hateful townspeople. When an estranged cousin arrives one day to help, things begin to change for the worse. This book made me anxious. It’s weird, creepy, and awesome.

Persepolis

Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi – 160 pgs.

This is a memoir told via graphics (comic book style) about the author’s experience growing up in Tehran during the Islamic Revolution. It provides a striking view of daily life during that time and glimpse into history. It’s a simple yet smart read that presents the effects of war and political turmoil through the eyes of a young girl.

F451

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury – 174 pgs.

Everyone should read this dystopian novel in which television is life and firemen start fires to destroy illegal contraband, including books. Guy is one of these firemen, and after meeting his strange neighbor Clarisse, he beings to question everything he thinks he understands about his world. Read it!

OceanEndLane

The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman – 178 pgs.

A man returns to his hometown for a funeral, reflecting on memories from childhood only to get swept back up in the world he thought he’d left behind. Keeping true to a Neil Gaiman fantasy, this strange story includes supernatural beings, evil creatures, and a familiar place that may not be what it seems.

Brooklyn

Another Brooklyn by Jacqueline Woodson – 192 pgs.

August returns home for her father’s funeral and runs into an old friend, bringing back a flood of memories from her childhood in Brooklyn in the 70’s. It’s about loss, family, girlhood, best friends, and the lasting effects of it all. It’s a lovely story, conveyed in bits and pieces that come together in the end.

HitchhikerGuide

Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams – 193 pgs.

Moments before Earth is destroyed, Arthur is transported to a space ship by Ford, an alien who has been posing as a human. Together they embark on a journey through the galaxy encountering strange and absurd beings along the way. It’s a fun book full of high-jinks, satire, and silliness. A cult classic!

Happy Reading!

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Summer Love + 10 Books with Summer Settings

Summer is the season of adventure. It’s the season love, friendship, travel, and new experiences. The sun shines bright and the heat warms our skin making us feel young and free and happy. Summer is when we aim to spend more time outside.

I have an abundance of amazing memories from my summers past – going out dancing, traveling through Europe, flying across country to see friends, marrying my favorite person in the world, lounging by the pool and reading for hours on end.

Summer is the season of reading. We seem to have extra time to devote to our books whether we find ourselves needing something to do on a flight or relaxing on the beach after a dip in the ocean. Books become our summer companions, and we turn to them for some of our adventures.

Here are some great reads to accompany your summer fun. They all start or take place during the summer season as well!

FrogMusic

Frog Music by Emma Donoghue

This story takes place in San Francisco during the summer heat wave of 1876. Blanche is a burlesque dancer distraught by the sudden murder of her friend Jenny. Blanche will stop at nothing to figure out the culprit and bring him to justice. Despite the plot line, this is not a fast-paced thriller. It’s a mystery that slowly unravels amidst vivid and through details that bring the setting and the characters of the story to life. The author even incorporates songs from the time into the book, which is quite cool and impressive in my opinion.

 

 

Bittersweet

Bittersweet by Miranda Beverly-Whittemore

Mabel feels average compared to her wild, beautiful, college roommate Ev. When Ev invites her to spend the summer together at her family’s estate, Mabel is ecstatic. She falls fast in love with the place and lifestyle, feeling like she finally belongs and is living the life she has always wanted. But there are dark secrets buried within this family, and Mabel is faced with a dilemma as she begins to uncover them. The novel is much darker than I anticipated but made me wish I summered in Vermont even more.

 

 

SummerBeforeWarThe Summer Before the War by Helen Simonson

After the death of her father, Beatrice takes a job as a Latin teacher in a small Sussex town. The story starts in the summer when Beatrice arrives and unfolds as she forms friendships with Agatha, the patron the supported her hiring, and her charismatic nephews. This book has a slow and steady pace that makes it easy to form attachments to the characters. It explores small town gossip, nontraditional relationship, social class, and gender roles during the time. When WWI begins, the lives of those in the small town will never be the same. I cried hard at the end.

 

 

TheGirlsThe Girls by Emma Cline

It’s summer in the late 1960’s, and a lonely 14-year old girl becomes mesmerized by an older girl and her free lifestyle that turns out to be a dangerous path in disguise. The cult and thriller aspects of this book are captivating, but what makes this book worth reading is the author’s exploration of the complex web of both female and male relationships and early interactions that shape who we are and who we become. It is dark and candid interpretation of the female coming-of-age experience that I found insightful.

 

 

EarthThe Secret Wisdom of the Earth by Christopher Scotton

After tragedy strikes, a boy moves with his mom over the summer to live with his grandfather in the Kentucky Appalachians. The boy finds solace in his relationship with his wise and rugged grandfather and with his new best friend as they explore the woods. When the town becomes divided over mountain blasting, a camping trip into to the wilderness becomes a fight for survival. It’s gritty and poignant. It’s also the author’s debut, and I can’t wait to read his next book!

 

 

LiarsWe Were Liars by E. Lockhart

A group of four friends spend carefree summers together on a family island until one of them has an accident and loses part of her memory. She returns the following summer to piece together the puzzle of what happened. This is a story about friendship, loss, and facing your demons. The negative ratings on Goodreads describe the book as tedious and pretentious, but I found something honest and beautiful in this coming-of-age story. I did listen to the audiobook and loved the narrator, so that likely improved my experience. I cried twice.

 

 

WhistlingGraveyardWhistling Past the Graveyard by Susan Crandall

It’s summertime in Mississippi 1963. When 9-year old Starla gets in trouble for attending the July 4th festival against her grandmother’s wishes, Starla runs away, aiming for Nashville, the city where her music star mother lives. On her way, Starla accepts a ride from Eula, a black woman suspiciously traveling with a white baby. Together they find themselves facing a series of incredible dangers. This is another book that took a darker and more violent turn than I anticipated, but the resolution brings it all full circle for a satisfying read.

 

 

ChaperoneThe Chaperone by Laura Moriarty

Before becoming silent film star, Louise Brooks traveled from her home in Kansas to set to NY to attend prestigious dance school. She was 15 at the time and thus forced to travel with chaperone, Cora Carlisle, who had personal reasons of her own for taking the job and making the 5-week trip. This work of historical fiction is an insightful reflection of the changing culture and values of the time. It was an intriguing read and left me wishing I could experience 1920s New York for myself. I think there is a plan for a feature film in the works!

 

 

InterestingsThe Interestings by Meg Wolitzer

This novel explores the complexity of friendship over time as lives shift and change, often leading people in directions they question or even regret. Six friends forge deep bonds when they first meet at art camp over the summer. While they are all clearly talented, some of them pursue successful artistic careers while others follow different paths. While the main character Jules is unlikable in my opinion, she provides a candid representation of envy, a prominent concept in this character-driven book, to which most of us can relate.

 

 

RainLighteningThe Scent of Rain and Lightning by Nancy Pickard

It’s summertime in small town Kansas when Jody learns that the man convicted of killing her father on the same night her mom disappeared, is getting out of prison and is getting a new trial, presided over by the convict’s son. New details come to light about the events of the horrible night that Jody lost both of her parents and her family will never be the same. This is a quick-paced suspenseful novel that was a fun and easy read. This is a great one to take with you on a road trip or flight!

 

 

Happy summer and happy reading!

Book Review: Caraval by Stephanie Garber

“Hope is a powerful thing. Some say it’s a different breed of magic altogether. Elusive, difficult to hold on to. But not much is needed.” 

Caraval is a wonderous place of magic. Scarlett has always dreamed of going, but her Caravalcruel father will never allow it. When she receives tickets to Caraval as a gift from the infamous Caraval Master Legend himself, Scarlett and her sister Tella run away to attend the show with the help of a handsome sailor. Shortly after their arrival however, Legend kidnaps Tella, and Scarlett soon learns that Tella’s disappearance is part of the Caraval game, and whoever finds her first wins. With the help of the mysterious sailor and other characters of intrigue along the way, Scarlett embarks on a dangerous adventure into the heart of Caraval to find and save her sister.

I am not a big fan of young adult novels (yet I somehow keep reading them), so my expectations of this book were somewhat low simply based on the genre, but I was pleasantly surprised at how much I really enjoyed this reading experience. Yes, the protagonist is frustrating in her naïveté at times, but I understand that’s part of her figuring things out and growing as a person in the YA experience. Despite that, I loved this book and could not put it down! It is captivating and imaginative and kept me wondering and guessing at every twist and turn as to what would happen next.

Marketers have heavily compared this book to Night Circus, and there is a little bit of truth in that, mostly in the sense that there is magic and mystery and secrets. There are also complicated relationships, both romantic and familial, but the premise is not so much a competition between star-crossed lovers but rather a race against time for a girl to find her sister as part of an elaborate game.

The descriptions in this book of the many sights, sounds, and characters conjured fantastical images in my mind. I loved imagining all of the costumes and dresses specifically. The story is visually very interesting, and I can easily see this book made into a movie.

The story is magical, creative, dark, and even a little racy via the dark allure of some characters and some passionate romantic scenes as well. There are endless twists and turns that play out in a magical world so you can never be sure what is real and what is true. It is a fun and exciting read that kept me guessing and wondering to the very end.

4.5 out of 5 stars

Book Review: A Constellation of Vital Phenomena by Anthony Marra

“We wear clothes, and speak, and create civilizations, and believe we are more than wolves. But inside us there is a word we cannot pronounce and that is who we are.” 

The setting is war-torn Chechnya in 2004. Explosions and disappearances are a way of life. After watching the Russian feds arrest his friend and set his house on fire, Akhmed is relieved to find his friend’s 8-year old daughter Havaa hiding in the woods and knows he must take her to a safe place. Sonya, a talented and overworked surgeon who is Constellationhaunted by the disappearance of her sister, agrees to take in Havaa in exchange for Akhmed’s help at the hospital. Meanwhile, someone is still looking for Havaa.

The heart of the plot takes place over only 5 days, but the whole story unfolds through various character perspectives and flashbacks throughout the previous ten years. At first the setting distracted me from everything else. I knew next to nothing about the Chechen wars and paused in between chapters to do some research and get a better understanding of the history. I was shocked to learn how much of the historical context of the novel is true, but it helped me grasp what the characters were facing and trying to endure.

The book gracefully dives head first into the strength and resilience that people are capable of when duty and dignity calls for it while highlighting the lasting effects of traumatic experience.  The story comes full circle, intertwining together the fates of the characters, materializing meaning in unexpected ways. While there is some hopeful resolution, there also remains a sense of emptiness and loss, which solidifies the book’s powerful impact.

In this book war is life. It’s a haunting story that transported me to a place I’m thankful I’ve never actually been, but it’s important to have exposure to perspectives and experiences different from your own to see what the world for others can be like. This book provided that for me, and it still left me hopeful.

4.5 out of 5 stars

Book Review: The Last One by Alexandra Oliva

“They’ll wait until I’m asleep – or nearly asleep – to strike. That’s how they do it; they blur the line between reality and nightmare. They give me bad dreams, and then they make them come true.” 

Twelve contestants compete in a new survivalist reality TV show, one that is rumored to LastOnehave unprecedented reach and special effects. As the contestants compete in teams as well as individually, they begin to understand the lengths to which the show producers will go. After the solo challenge begins, catastrophe strikes, and the contestant we know as Zoo struggles to decide what is reality TV and what is true reality.

Two words: dramatic irony. Dramatic irony exists when the reader knows things that the characters inside the story do not know. This book is dramatic irony to the extreme. Through most of the book, the reader has highly important information about which the protagonist is in the dark. For me personally, I struggle with dramatic irony. I prefer to learn information at the same time as the characters so that I’m embarking on their journeys with them. Knowing things that the characters don’t is a major source of anxiety and frustration for me as part of the reading experience, and it is not a style that I particularly enjoy. It was a hard book for me to endure.

That said, this book is still great. Aside from my own struggles with dramatic irony, this story is interesting, entertaining, and does a great job of exploring the psychological aspects of human nature and behavior under duress. It’s dark and captivating and attention grabbing. I really liked the varying reality TV personalities. Their characters and actions were consistent with a reality TV setup, and the insight into editing and production manipulation was on point (speaking as someone who worked in reality TV production). Zoo’s internal dialogue felt repetitive and a little long at times, but I like the juxtaposition of her solo journey with that of the reality show plot and how they unfolded together.

If you like dark books laden with suspense, unease, and exasperation, this book is for you. The agony of the anticipation lasts all the way to very last page. It’s an intense read that is very well written and grabs ahold of you from the start.

3.5 out of 5 stars

Book Review: American Housewife: Stories by Helen Ellis

“The only thing with less character than Chardonnay is wainscoting.” 

A Manhattan housewife lures in and befriends the doormen at her building, but her motive is not what you think. A woman provides a “relocation” service for pageant girls. A writer stands her ground while competing on a reality TV show. From book club secrets to life advice from cats, this collection of twelve stories is darkly comedic yet also steeped in truth.

AmericanHousewifeThe book satirizes the dark side of the feminine mind and the interplay of catty and manipulative relationships. It also emphasizes the strength and intelligence of the female characters as well, ringing the bell of truth at times. I found myself smiling and shaking my head, relating to them and laughing in part at the silliness of myself. I chuckled aloud a few times but then felt slightly disturbed at other times. The characters are witty, sassy, and sinister.

The title led me to think that all of the stories are related to the lives of women who do not work, but that is not the case. Some are housewives, some are writers, and some are undefined, creating a wider range of topics and themes. Also, not all of the stories are plot based. Some of them are written as simple advice or commentary, and I think the piece called Take It From Cats is the best.

However, I much prefer the plot driven stories. My favorites are Dumpster Diving with the Stars, Dead Doormen, and My Novel Is Brought to You By the Good People at Tampax. I loved the incessant and ludicrous procrastination of the character in the last story!

The stories are strange and creative and all very different.  It is a great collection that has something for everyone.

3.5 out of 5 stars

Book Review: One Plus One by Jojo Moyes

“The law of probability combined with the law of large numbers states that to beat the odds, sometimes you have to repeat an event an increasing number of times in order to get you to the outcome you desire. The more you do, the closer you get. Or… basically, sometimes you just have to keep going.”

Ed is a software company mogul accused of insider trading, suspended from work, and OnePlusOnewho is avoiding facing his family. Jess is a single mom working two jobs and struggling to provide for her daughter Tanzie, stepson Nicky, and giant dog Norman. When Tanzie, a child highly gifted in math, has a chance to compete in an elite math competition and potentially win enough money to secure a place at a respected private school, Jess will do what it takes to make it happen. Her world collides with Ed’s through a few chance encounters, and Ed suddenly finds himself invested in helping Jess and her kids (and Norman) make it to the math competition, which is just a road trip away. Shenanigans ensue, secrets are revealed, and bonds are forged and strengthened.

Jojo Moyes is a talented writer who creates interesting and memorable characters. This book is no different. Although for me it didn’t quite have the emotional impact as some of her other books, this one is still a rollercoaster ride as the characters struggle to overcome personal challenges. None of them are perfect, and that’s what makes them so relatable yet also unique.

I’m a sucker for the dog in any story, especially a lovable one like Norman who plays a part in the family dynamics and in the plot. I love Jess’s supermom character. Her desperation to provide sometimes propels her forward without thinking her decisions all the way through, but her heart is always in the right place. She is the guiding force for her kids Tanzie and Nicky and is an easy character to root for, even when she’s kicking in the side of someone else’s car. Ed, who is much more selfish, is less likable, but he grew on me through redemptive interactions with Jess and her family. All of the characters learn, grow, and change, which makes for a satisfying read.

This book explores the concepts of family support systems, unconditional love, honesty, and forgiveness. The bullying plot line is a hard and frustrating one, as it should be, but it emphasizes the important themes of leaning to be true to oneself, regardless of the opinions of others. It’s a great story complete with fun, laughs, tears, and drama, and it’s another great book by Jojo Moyes.

4 out of 5 stars