Book Nerd: A Return to Reading + 11 Short Books to Get You Started

I caught on to the joy of reading at an early age. My parents are both readers, and their passion was contagious. I read books under the covers when I was supposed to be taking a nap. I loved going to the library with my mom and picking out books. I was the kid in class who got in trouble for reading a book in her lap rather than paying attention to the teacher’s lecture. I devoured books.

But I stopped reading in college. Well, I read textbooks and book assignments of course, but I didn’t read recreationally. Like most students, I just didn’t have the time. Graduate school was the same story. I both worked and studied full time.

When I finally finished school and found myself with a surprising amount of free time on my hands, I slowly returned to my passion for reading. I struggled at first to focus, to really let go and lose myself in the stories, but now I consume books like they are sustenance.

It’s easy to fall out of the habit of reading. We get busy, get distracted, get interested in other things. Then it’s hard to get started again, to make the time to sit down and commit to a book. Sometimes it’s easiest to start small, to start with a short book that requires a minimal time commitment and that we can absorb in small doses.

Here are some great short books, less than 200 pages (depending on the edition), capable of reviving one’s passion for reading:

Mice

Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck – 112 pgs.

Two drifters dream of one day having their own piece of land but in the meantime find work at a California ranch, but difficult situations arrive that force them to face the harshness of reality. It’s a short, simple story but it hit me hard, and it’s written perfectly.

Night

Night by Elie Wiesel – 120 pgs.

This is a memoir of Wiesel’s personal experience in the Nazi concentration camps. It’s candid and dark and insightful as he contemplates the nature of humanity and the existence of God. I read it in junior high, and it was my first experience with such a powerful read.

Stranger

The Stranger by Albert Camus – 123 pgs.

A man goes on trial for committing murder, but one soon realizes that it’s his lack of social conformity that quietly condemns him. This is a prime example of how a great author can pack and immense amount of commentary and philosophy into a short novel.

GiftFromSea

Gift from the Sea by Anne Morrow Lindbergh – 144 pgs.

I read this on my honeymoon swinging in a hammock on the beach. It’s a quiet, contemplative read comprised of the author’s thoughts and reflections on her life as a wife, mother, and writer. It’s considered a classic, written in 1955, but is still wholly relevant to modern times.

Tuck

Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbit – 160 pgs.

A century ago, the Tuck family found and drank from a spring that turned out to be a fountain of immortality. When ten-year old Winnie finds the spring in the woods by her house, the Tuck family kidnaps her to buy time to convince her why drinking from it is a bad idea. Meanwhile, a dark stranger is hunting them.

LivedInCastle

We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson – 160 pgs.

After a gruesome tragedy, a family of three sequesters themselves inside their home, safe from the hateful townspeople. When an estranged cousin arrives one day to help, things begin to change for the worse. This book made me anxious. It’s weird, creepy, and awesome.

Persepolis

Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi – 160 pgs.

This is a memoir told via graphics (comic book style) about the author’s experience growing up in Tehran during the Islamic Revolution. It provides a striking view of daily life during that time and glimpse into history. It’s a simple yet smart read that presents the effects of war and political turmoil through the eyes of a young girl.

F451

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury – 174 pgs.

Everyone should read this dystopian novel in which television is life and firemen start fires to destroy illegal contraband, including books. Guy is one of these firemen, and after meeting his strange neighbor Clarisse, he beings to question everything he thinks he understands about his world. Read it!

OceanEndLane

The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman – 178 pgs.

A man returns to his hometown for a funeral, reflecting on memories from childhood only to get swept back up in the world he thought he’d left behind. Keeping true to a Neil Gaiman fantasy, this strange story includes supernatural beings, evil creatures, and a familiar place that may not be what it seems.

Brooklyn

Another Brooklyn by Jacqueline Woodson – 192 pgs.

August returns home for her father’s funeral and runs into an old friend, bringing back a flood of memories from her childhood in Brooklyn in the 70’s. It’s about loss, family, girlhood, best friends, and the lasting effects of it all. It’s a lovely story, conveyed in bits and pieces that come together in the end.

HitchhikerGuide

Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams – 193 pgs.

Moments before Earth is destroyed, Arthur is transported to a space ship by Ford, an alien who has been posing as a human. Together they embark on a journey through the galaxy encountering strange and absurd beings along the way. It’s a fun book full of high-jinks, satire, and silliness. A cult classic!

Happy Reading!

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This Is Not About Kittens (Okay, Maybe A Little)

I may not always know what to say, but I continue to daydream and trust that words will come. Writing makes me look closer at things. It leads me to ponder things more deeply and to consider them from different perspectives.

Sometimes when I’m stuck on what to write, I tell the person closest to me about it. Giving voice to the obstacle sometimes helps me to work through it. My husband K in an effort to be supportive offers ideas, which usually consist of recent experiences that he and I had together. His latest suggestion involved kittens.

We recently went to look at a house going up for sale. It was a major fixer-upper but had great character. As we explored the big backyard, a strange noise floated up above the wind in the trees and rung in my ears. I froze, listening hard, and there the sound came again. Kittens!

I followed the high-pitched mewing to a stone fountain broken into pieces and IMG_0566overturned in a bed of monkey grass. There I found him – a tiny gray kitten, the giver-away of the hiding spot. I picked him up and snuggled him close to me as K scooped up his three siblings. They were so small and sweet yet fierce with their sharp claws in permanent protrusion from their soft padded kitten feet.

When we first ventured into the backyard, K and I saw a couple of adult cats watching us cautiously before jumping the fence and taking off. One of those was likely the mama of these kittens. Their place of refuge was a good one, complete with multiple hiding spots and cover from sun and rain. They ran to each other and huddled together as we placed them back where we found them, confident that their mom would return.

I thought about the kittens all that night and the next day. I tried not to worry, trusting that the mama cat would do her best because that’s the nature of things. Still, K and I brought over some kitten food. We quietly crept into the yard, anticipating listening for the sounds of mewing, but the stone fountain and monkey grass were empty. We searched the yard and called for the kittens but to no avail. Mama cat did her job and moved them to a new place, a safer place. We set out the food anyway just in case and silently wished the kittens well.

I appreciated K’s suggestion to write about this experience, but I decided against it. What was the moral of the story? What was the point? Yet I continued to think about it, to replay the events in my head, and as I did, the seeds of those thoughts began to grow and spark questions in my mind.

Those questions sparked conversations between K and I – philosophical conversations, and from there I have continued to ponder and question a plethora of beliefs and ideas, reconsidering my perspective on certain things I have thought to be true, all because I found some stray kittens and thought about the experience more deeply than usual.

I realized that finding those kittens and reflecting on the story gave me insight. I did not know it at the time, but it was an experience that for a few minutes caused me to be present and thankful.  From that experience I was able to appreciate the small moments that make me see and feel something outside my normal realm and routine. It distracted me from myself and presented something new and wonderful. From there I could reflect on writing, on what I wanted to say.

This is why I don’t simply give up when I don’t know what to say when I write.  Writing has made me more conscientious of my world. I realized that I don’t write so much as to make an impact as to influence. I write because the act influences me. It makes me a better person, and it has given me a better and happier life.